Skip to Main Content

Referencing style - AGLC4: Journal Articles

This Guide provides basic information on formatting references according to the Australian Guide to Legal Citation 4. It also provides information on using AGLC4 with EndNote.

Journal Articles

The table below includes examples of how to cite Journal Articles and the various elements to include and the formatting you need to use, to construct the citations correctly.

Journal Articles

Material Type

(AGLC Rule)

Footnote Example

 Bibliography Example

Journal Article: One author, no issue number

(Rules 5.1 and 5.10)

Augusto Zimmerman, ‘How Brazilian Judges Undermine the Rule of Law.  A Critical Appraisal’ (2008) 11 International Trade and Business Law Review 179, 184.

Zimmerman, Augusto, ‘How Brazilian Judges Undermine the Rule of Law.  A Critical Appraisal’ (2008) 11 International Trade and Business Law Review 179

Journal Article: Two authors, issue number, with pinpoint   

(Rules 5.1, 5.4 and 5.7)

(NB: See Rule 4.1.2 for more than 3 authors

Simon Young and Sarah Murray, 'An Elegant Convergence? The Constitutional Entrenchment of Jurisdictional Error Review in Australia' (2011) 11(2) Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal 117, 118.

Young, Simon and Sarah Murray, 'An Elegant Convergence? The Constitutional  Entrenchment of Jurisdictional Error Review in Australia' (2011) 11(2) Oxford University Commonwealth Law Journal 117

Journal Article: No author, no issue number

(Rules 5.1 and 5.10)

Note, 'Live Free and Nullify: Against Purging Capital Juries of Death Penalty Opponents' (2014) 127 Harvard Law Review 2092. 

Note: If the article is unsigned, the type of article, such as Note or Comment, should appear in place of the authors name. 

Note, 'Live Free and Nullify: Against Purging Capital Juries of Death Penalty Opponents' (2014) 127 Harvard Law Review 2092 

Journal Article: Online journal, more than three authors, issue number with pinpoint

(Rules 5.1, 5.4 and 5.10)

1 William Brown, 'Limitations of Code in Contracts: What we can Learn from the Plain English Movement' (2019) 9(1) Victoria University Law and Justice Journal 57-72, 68. 

Note: Online journal articles should, as far as possible be cited in the same way was articles in printed journals.

Brown, William, 'Limitations of Code in Contracts: What we can Learn from the Plain English Movement' (2019) 9(1) Victoria University Law and Justice Journal 57

Journal Article: Forthcoming

(Rule 5.11)

1  Kit Baker and Katelyn Lamont, 'Misfeasance in Public Office: Raw Statistics from the Australian Front Line' (2021) 43(3) Sydney Law Review (forthcoming).

Note: For forthcoming articles the starting page should be replaced with '(forthcoming)'. For articles available as an advance the starting page should be replaced with '(advance)'.

Baker, Kit and Katelyn Lamont, 'Misfeasance in Public Office: Raw Statistics from the Australian Front Line' (2021) 43(3) Sydney Law Review (forthcoming)

 

Common mistakes

When you cite Journal Articles, certain elements must be included in the citation, but it is very easy to overlook certain elements and make common mistakes. Here are some common mistakes that are made when citing Journal Articles. 

  • Formatting the authors names incorrectly: First name Surname structure should be adopted in the Footnotes; Surname First name structure should be adopted in the Bibliography. For information on how to deal with multiple authors please see Rule 4.1.2.   
  • Not using 'single quotation marks' for the 'Article Title' -  use 'single quotes' around 'Article Titles', NOT "double quotes".
  • Forgetting to italicise the Journal Title - the Journal Title must be italicised. Always remember to italicise Journal Titles when you cite journal articles.
  • Abbreviating the Journal Name - the journal title MUST NOT be abbreviated. You need to include the full name of the journal title. The word The should not be included at the start. See Rule 5.5 for more information.   
  • Not including the volume / issue numbers. See Rule 5.4 for more information. 
  • Not including the start page - the number of the start page must be included - there is no need to use a comma to separate the start page and the journal title. 

CONTENT LICENCE

 Except for logos, Canva designs or where otherwise indicated, content in this guide is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International Licence.